ShakespeareS Othello Essay Research Paper Shakespeare

Shakespeare? S Othello Essay, Research Paper

Shakespeare & # 8217 ; s Othello begins with a matrimony between Othello and Desdemona. This matrimony was the consequence of the strong bond of love which they felt together. During their matrimony, Othello started to experience a sense of green-eyed monster with Desdemona & # 8217 ; s behaviour. This green-eyed monster was being created by Desdemona & # 8217 ; s beauty and sexual power. With the presence of Desdemona, Othello felt belittled with her gender. Female gender is a menace to the patriarchal society, and Othello must command it. Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender greatly threatens her hubby, Othello. To extinguish Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender and reconstruct her pureness, Othello must kill his married woman. This will liberate Othello from her sexual influence. In Shakespeare & # 8217 ; s Othello, Desdemona & # 8217 ; s sexual menace novices Othello & # 8217 ; s insecurity towards their matrimony, doing him to redefine himself as a adult male of violent action.

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Early on on in the drama, Othello intimates that Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender is a menace towards himself and his behaviour. Othello pinpoints the beginning of this debasement when he recounts his relationship with Desdemona: & # 8220 ; She loved me for the dangers I had base on balls & # 8217 ; vitamin D, /And I loved her that she did commiseration them. & # 8221 ; Othello moves from a soldierly universe to one governed by maternal commiseration. This motion robs Othello of his manhood, returning him to a child-like province of dependance. For illustration, Janet Adelman states & # 8220 ; Making himself susceptible to Desdemona & # 8217 ; s commiseration, that is, Othello unmakes the footing for his soldierly individuality, interchanging it for one dependant on her. & # 8221 ; This autonomy affected his masculine individuality, which changed because of his new demand of her love. This return to childhood behavior reawakens Othello & # 8217 ; s sense of exposure that Othello managed to hide as a soldier. Furthermore, Othello tells the senate, & # 8220 ; For since these weaponries of mine had seven old ages & # 8217 ; pith, /Till now some nice Moons wasted & # 8230 ; & # 8221 ; The thought that Moons could blow Othello & # 8217 ; s weaponries suggests that female gender ( represented by the lunar catamenial rhythm ) can sabotage Othello & # 8217 ; s maleness ( represented by the weaponries that carry his arms ) . Othello begins depicting his relationship with Desdemona that her aura creates a continued sense of weakness for Othello. In the beginning of the drama, Othello begins to recognize Desdemona & # 8217 ; s menace towards him and his behaviour by saying that he feels weakened by her presence.

In add-on to his fright of domination by a adult females, Othello fears domination by his ain feelings towards her. As stated by Martha Ronk & # 8220 ; The consequent province of pandemonium, green-eyed monster and sexual phantasy into which Othello dips, literally undoes him as he falls to the land in a trance. & # 8221 ; Othello & # 8217 ; s jealousy causes the degeneracy of his self-denial and his behavior. He becomes enthrall with Desdemona & # 8217 ; s behaviour which is easy doing his suicide with his feelings being control by Desdemona. Furthermore, Othello & # 8217 ; s confidences to the senate that this will non go on & # 8220 ; the immature affects/In me defunct & # 8221 ; sounds as if he is seeking to convert himself more than the Godheads. Othello fears that the waking up of his sexual desires for Desdemona may pull authority from his soldierly art. Besides significantly, Othello says about his matrimony & # 8220 ; If it were now to decease, / & # 8217 ; Twere now to be most happy. & # 8221 ; Othello acknowledges that the taint of his masculine power by female gender is preventive to his felicity. Othello & # 8217 ; s character defects reveals that he is incapacitated among the presence of Desdemona.

Othello must face both facets of Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender, foremost, through the consummation of their matrimony, and with the possibility that she is holding an matter. In recognizing the state of affairs, Othello cries out:

What sense had I of her stol & # 8217 ; n hours of lecherousness?

Farewell the plumy troop, and the large wars

That make aspiration virtuousness! O, farewell

Pride, gaudery and circumstance of glorious war! & # 8230 ;

Farewell! Othello & # 8217 ; s business & # 8217 ; s gone!

Othello & # 8217 ; s character was wholly taken over by his failing with his influence from Desdemona. Female gender destroys Othello & # 8217 ; s maleness: his ability for violent combat when he comes to confront with Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender. Furthermore, Othello expresses his fright of female gender through the hankie which was given to Desdemona as a gift from Othello. Othello describes the hankie in being & # 8220 ; A sibyl & # 8230 ; In her prophetic rage sew & # 8217 ; d the work ; /The worms were hallow & # 8217 ; d that did engender the silk ; & # 8221 ; which can be seen as a sexu

al mention with the image of the worms “breed [ ing ] “ . Besides significantly, the hankie besides represents the power that female gender has over work forces. When explicating the significance of the hankie to Desdemona, Othello says “…The ideas of people: she told her, while she kept it, /’T would do her good-humored and subdue my father/Entirely to her love…” Othello frights that Desdemona will non compare her desires to his ain. The possibility that she should give away the hankie, and therefore command her ain desires, causes Othello great hurt. As stated by Rob Wilson “…who can do of Desdemona’s hankie a ( false ) mark of her matrimonial falsity and maternal treachery and of mere handshake an index ( mark ) of extramarital lust…” Because of the symbolic value of the hankie, Othello took the lost hankie as a mark of matrimonial noncompliance. Throughout the drama, Othello must face his ain insecurity towards Desdemona and besides the possibility that Desdemona is holding an matter, which his covetous fury led to his concluding autumn.

In order to recover his maleness, Othello must command Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender. Othello first inherent aptitude is to violently destruct their matrimony. He wants to & # 8220 ; chop her into musss & # 8221 ; , sloping her blood a 2nd clip. His 2nd suggestion of poisoning her reminds us that Othello is genuinely the 1 respnsible for Desdemona & # 8217 ; s & # 8220 ; dross & # 8221 ; . The image of his giving his married woman a toxicant is a deformed image of his sexually polluting her through intercourse. At Iago & # 8217 ; s suggestion, Othello decides to strangulate her in & # 8220 ; the bed she hath contaminated & # 8221 ; . Shakespeare makes it abiguous with whom Desdemona has contaminated the bed. At first glimpse, Iago seems to be mentioning to Desdemona & # 8217 ; s supposed matter with Cassio. However, Shakespeare ne’er suggests that they used Desdemona and Othello & # 8217 ; s bed. The lone individual we know for certain that had intercourse with Desdemona in that bed, thereby polluting it, is Othello. Besides significantly, Othello & # 8217 ; s determination to strange his married woman is an effort to sublimate Desdemona and the bed: & # 8220 ; Yet I & # 8217 ; ll non shed her blood & # 8221 ; . Neither his married woman or his bed will be stained with & # 8220 ; lust & # 8217 ; s blood. & # 8221 ; Emilia foreshadows Othello & # 8217 ; s try to undo the consummation when she says & # 8220 ; I might make & # 8217 ; t as good I & # 8217 ; the dark & # 8230 ; and undo & # 8217 ; T when I had done & # 8221 ; . As if in response to her words, Othello says that he will & # 8220 ; Put out the light [ the taper ] , and so put out the light [ Desdemona ] & # 8221 ; Furthermore, Janet Adelman states & # 8220 ; & # 8230 ; if virginity is the land of Othello & # 8217 ; s desire, decease is its lone preservative. & # 8221 ; Once Othello has & # 8220 ; raped & # 8221 ; Desdemona, she must decease. In decease, Desdemona loses her gender, therefore recovering her pureness and virginity. Othello can now shrive himself for doing her impure, and one time once more acknowledge his love for his married woman: & # 8220 ; I will kill thee, /And love thee after & # 8221 ; .

Othello & # 8217 ; s ruin was the consequence of his ain fashioning. Iago may hold aggravated the state of affairs, but Othello & # 8217 ; s ain anxiousness toward Desdemona & # 8217 ; s gender would hold forced her decease regardless. The patriarchal society demands that a adult female must non hold desires of her ain. In the narrative of Othello, Desdemona & # 8217 ; s, who is stand foring adult females in general, gender is a dual menace towards the patriarchal society. Not merely may a adult female sexually desire any adult male she chooses, but a adult male & # 8217 ; s desire for a adult females emasculates him by doing him subservient to her desires. With that message, Othello reinforces that Shakespeare believes that female gender should be removed from the kingdom of the patriarchate.

Bibliography

Adamson, W. D. & # 8220 ; Unpinned or Undone? : Desdeona & # 8217 ; s Critics and the Problem of Sexual Innocence. & # 8221 ; Detroit: Gale Research inc. , 1997. 360-367.

Adelman, Janet. & # 8220 ; Is Thy Union Here? : Union and Its Discontentments in Troilus and Cressida and Othello & # 8221 ; . Shakespearian Criticism, Vol. 22. Detroit: Gale Research inc. , 1994. 339-354.

Pechter, Edward. & # 8220 ; Have you non read of some such thing? Sexual activity and Sexual narratives in Othello. & # 8221 ; Shakespearean Criticism, Vol. 37. Detroit: Gale Research inc. , 1998. 269-276.

Rice, Julian. & # 8220 ; Desdemona & # 8221 ; . Shakespearian Criticism, Vol. 35. Detroit: Gale Research inc. , 1997. 352-360.

Ronk, Martha. & # 8220 ; Recasting Jealousy: A Reading of The Winter & # 8217 ; s narrative & # 8221 ; . Literature and Psychology, Vol XXXVI, 1990. 50-77.

Shakespeare, William. Othello ( New Penguin Shakespeare ) . New York: Penguin inc. , 1981.

Wilson, Rob. & # 8220 ; Jealousy: Othello and The Winter & # 8217 ; s Tale & # 8221 ; . Shakespearian Criticism, Vol. 44. Detroit: Gale Research inc. , 1999. 57-64.