Shel Silverstein Essay Research Paper While I

Shel Silverstein Essay, Research Paper

While I was turning up as a kid, there were three writers whose plants I read

piously. One was Dr. Seuss and I liked his books so much that I am proud to state

I have read every one published. The 2nd writer who had a profound impact on

me was Jan Bernstein who is responsible for that lovable household The Bernstein

Bears. The 3rd is a poet, which is uneven because I ne’er have liked poesy. Shel

Silverstein? s kids? s poesy books were the lone poesy I read until I

was 12 and are the one? s I still enjoy the most today as a immature adult male. Shel

Silverstein is known to most as the critically acclaimed kids? s poet, and

before this undertaking, I was unaware of the other things he had done. Shel

Silverstein besides did sketchs, served for his state during the Korean War,

wrote common people vocals, played the guitar, and likely most flooring to me, were his

verse forms and drawings for Playboy Magazine which depicted reasonably ghastly sexual

Acts of the Apostless every bit good as drug usage, particularly his ain. Life experience seems to be the

influence for his NC-17 rated stuff but I was funny to who influenced his

witty, lyrical kids? s pieces. When analyzing Silverstein? s poesy, you

can see how the nonsensical topics and rimes look similar to Edward Lear? s

nonsensical poesy of one hundred and fifty old ages earlier and how the poesy of

Ogden Nash, which Silverstein might hold perchance read as a kid, had

influences on Shel? s ain pieces. However, the decision I have reached is

strictly conjectural. Shel Silverstein one time said he had no influences on his

poetic manner. In a 1975 interview with Jean Merciar, published in the February

24, 1975 issue of Publisher? s Weekly, Silverstein said, ? When I was kid- 12,

14, around there- I would much instead have been a good baseball participant or a hit

with the misss. But I couldn? t drama ball, I couldn? t dance. Fortunately the

misss didn? T want me ; non much I could make about that. So I started to pull and

to compose. I was besides lucky that I didn? Ts have anybody to copy, be impressed

by. I had developed my ain manner, I was making before I knew there was a

Thurber, a Benchley, a Price and a Steinberg. I ne’er even saw their work boulder clay I

was around 30. By the clip I got to where I was pulling misss, I was

already into work, and it was more of import to me. Not that I wouldn? T instead

do love, but the work has become a wont? Even though Shel says cipher

influenced his artistic abilities it is difficult to believe that. Particularly when

you see how similar some of his pieces are to Edward Lear? s. One of the most

capturing things about Silverstein? s poesy is that a study that he himself

Drew accompanies each one. They are normally amusing, humourous studies that add a

ocular reading to the verse form. I thought that merely Silverstein used such a

technique but Edward Lear used the same thought during the 1850? s. Besides

similar artistic abilities they besides made silly, cockamamie verse forms. Here? s an

illustration from Edward Lear: There was a Young Lady whose mentum, Resembled the point

of a pin ; So she had made it crisp, And purchased a harp, And played several

melodies with her mentum. Along with that piece, there is a amusing drawing of

precisely what the verse form says, a lady with a pointy mentum playing a harp. There is a

verse form in Falling Up, by Shel Silverstein that uses the same techniques: Scale If

merely I could see the graduated table, I? thousand sure that it would province That I? ve lost

ounces? possibly pounds Or even dozenss of weight. ? You? d better eat some

pancakes- You? re every bit scraggy as a rail. ? I? thousand sure that? s what the graduated table

would state? If I could see the graduated table. ( Silvers

tein, p. 12 ) Of class there is a

study of a fat adult male standing on a graduated table he can non see, done by Shel himself.

Besides being humourous pieces, there are other similarities you can deduce. Both

poets use the same phrase they used to get down and to complete their respective

verse forms. However, Edward Lear ne’er took his poesy every bit far as Silverstein. Most of

Lear? s verse forms are five lines long and all have a rhyme strategy of AABBA and they

all repeat some form the first line for the stoping. Basically, Silverstein

progressed on Lear? s thoughts and signifier, as did Ogden Nash. Ogden Nash was a

kids? s poet whose plants were being published during Silverstein? s

childhood. Even though he says he ne’er read them, you can? t aid but notice

similarities one time once more. Nash was a maestro of visible radiation and capricious poetries, a

trait Silverstein had every bit good. Nash? s capable affair wasn? t rather as

juvenile and his verse forms on occasion use big vocabulary words like buttocks.

Nash is likely best known for his four-line verse form titled Contemplations on

Icebreaking. Candy Is Dandy But spirits Is quicker Ogden had many pieces that

would subsequently resemble Silverstein? s, like The Cow. The cow is of the bovine

like ; One terminal is moo, the other milk. This verse form is so improbably simple it is

about mind-boggling. Silverstein was a maestro of acquiring a point across with as

small words as necessary merely like Ogden? s piece. STONE AIRPLANE I made an

aeroplane out of rock? I ever did like remaining place. Very simple, yet it is

an adequate to do the reader understand the point. Another verse form by Ogden Nash

that has a batch in common with Silverstein? s work, is his verse form called The

Termite. It uses iambic pentameter with four steps per line and has a rime

strategy of AABB. Some Primal Termite knocked on wood And tasted it, and found it

good! And that is why your Cousin May Fell through the parlour floor today Shel

Silverstein has at least two twelve verse forms that follow this form but the one I

ever liked is called Don the Dragon? s Birthday. Here he comes across the

lake. He? s comin? for his birthday bar. Singing? Happy Birthday, Dragon

Don, ? And watch him blow his tapers? on. Silverstein besides uses iambic

pentameter with four steps per line and follows the same rime strategy, AABB.

Other similarities between Nash and Silverstein include their picks of subjects.

Both have legion verse forms about animate beings, particularly the small apprehended ( the

white ant ) and the fictional ( unicorns and firedrakes ) . Even though Silverstein says

her ne’er read Nash or Lear their several manners of poesy seem to hold been

emulated by Silverstein in his work. Those are the chief two influences on

Silverstein? s poesy. Even though he says he ne’er read them, their

parts to poetry paved the manner for Shel Silverstein. Edward Lear and

Ogden Nash made cockamamie poesy with no concealed metaphors acceptable to the critics

every bit good as mainstream America. They were, by far the two largest influences,

even though possibly non straight, on Silverstein? s poesy. Because of these

three work forces and Dr. Seuss amusing, silly, lyrical poetries and verse forms are now accepted

and even embraced by people all over the universe.

Bibliography

1. Friday, Sely. hypertext transfer protocol: //195.114233.19/Silverstein/bio.html. 2/29/2000. 2.

hypertext transfer protocol: //www2.pair.com/mgraz/Lear/BoN/bon020.html. 3/5/2000. 3. Silverstein, Shel.

Falling Up, Scale. Harper Collins Publishers, New York City. P. 12 4. Nash,

Megan. hypertext transfer protocol: //www.westegg.com/nash/ice-breaking.cgi 3/5/2000. 5. Nash. hypertext transfer protocol: //www.westegg.com/nash/cow.cgi

3/5/2000 6. Silverstein p 49. 7. Nash hypertext transfer protocol: //www.westegg.com/nash/cow.cgi

3/5/2000 8. Silverstein p.54