The Use Of Metaphors Through Filming Techniques Essay

In The Graduate Essay, Research Paper

The Use of Metaphors Through Filming Techniques in The Graduate

Every coevals says it won & # 8217 ; t go on to them. & # 8220 ; I & # 8217 ; m non traveling to be like my parents. I & # 8217 ; m non traveling to sell out my dreams. & # 8221 ; Nothing captures this thought better than The Graduate ( Nichols, 1967. ) In this distorted movie of a college pupil, Benjamin Braddock ( Dustin Hoffman, ) and his hunt for himself, the manager Mike Nichols uses a battalion of metaphors to escalate feelings and emotions. Nichols uses a overplus of shooting techniques to assist accomplish his coveted consequence. Seductive flashes, colour deformation, and a scuba suit are merely a few of the many metaphors that Nichols uses in The Graduate. This coming of age movie is a dateless authoritative, due in portion to the cinematographic mastermind demonstrated by Nichols.

A perfect illustration of Nichols & # 8217 ; usage of metaphors to show Ben & # 8217 ; s feelings occurs during the ill-famed scene in which the older Mrs. Robinson ( Anne Bancroft ) seduces him. When Ben proceeds to Elaine Robinson & # 8217 ; s ( Katharine Ross ) sleeping room to return Mrs. Robinson her bag, a bare Mrs. Robinson follows in behind him and rapidly locks the door. As she offers her organic structure to Ben, a series of flashes of Mrs. Robinson & # 8217 ; s chests and waistline appear. First her chests, so waist, so breasts, and waist once more. These speedy flashes last lone fractions of a 2nd each and offer a glance into the rapid hesitation of Ben & # 8217 ; s determination procedure. Besides, the flashes tell us a great trade of Ben & # 8217 ; s personality. Having been raised, or instead instructed, to move as a disciplined and scrupulous immature adult male, the bulk of his attending is directed above the cervix of Mrs. Robinson. However, Ben can non assist from peeping downward at the seductive Mrs. Robinson. It is evident that the flashes in this scene represent the desires that arise upon Ben & # 8217 ; s screening of the bare Mrs. Robinson. It is besides clear that Ben & # 8217 ; s bosom is rushing as sexual ideas run through his caput, nevertheless, at this point in the movie Ben has non resolute about doing his ain determinations. Although he is a college alumnus, Ben has become a animal of wont stand outing at what he is told to make, but forbearing from moving on his ain intuition. Consequently, Ben rejects Mrs. Robinson & # 8217 ; s initial offer, and flights from the sleeping room unscathed physically, but changed everlastingly psychologically. Although taught that personal businesss are immoral, Ben is full of wonder, energy, and fright as he exists the Robinson & # 8217 ; s place, and with the encouraging words of Mr. Robinson ( Murray Hamilton ) to, & # 8220 ; sow some wild oats, & # 8221 ; the spectator gets the feeling that Ben will fall into the custodies of enticement and take Mrs. Robinson & # 8217 ; s wayward offer. The usage of these flashes helps the spectator relate to Ben & # 8217 ; s thought procedure, and in bend, makes him more identifiable.

Another cardinal scene in which Nichols & # 8217 ; usage of metaphors enhances the movie occurs on Ben & # 8217 ; s 21st birthday. This birth day of the month is really of import to many people, as it marks the terminal of boyhood, and the beginning of manhood. However, Ben & # 8217 ; s 21st birthday served as a volatile accelerator for this transmutation, and perchance represents the most of import twenty-four hours of his life. For his birthday, Ben is given a aqualung su

it, and his parents throw him a party full of household friends. After a impermanent submerging, Ben decides to come up, merely to be pushed back under H2O twice by his male parent ( William Daniels. ) Ben so proceeds to drop to the deepnesss of the in land pool, temporarily get awaying human contact. A feeling of solitariness is exuded as Ben sits at the underside of the pool without an effort to surface, and remains there for an drawn-out period of clip. The cloudy image shows Ben continue through chartless ideas. By falsifying the visual aspect of the H2O Nichols shows Ben’s ill-defined and indecisive idea procedure. However, upon doing his determination to name Mrs. Robinson the image becomes clear one time once more. Ben’s desires become clearer as does the H2O. It is obvious that Ben has made up his head, and will hold an matter with Mrs. Robinson. By utilizing the H2O as a metaphor, Nichols was able to play upon the feelings of his viewing audiences and farther heighten their relationship with our chief character, Ben. This scene is another illustration of the usage of metaphors through which Nichols expresses Ben’s ideas.

Another scene in which Nichols uses metaphors to assist the spectator identify with the chief character occurs when Ben is lazily drifting on his raft in the pool. There is an obvious transmutation in Ben as he is now clicking sunglassess, and imbibing beer. The H2O appears to scintillate crystal clear, representing his certainty and assurance in the determination that he has made to kip with Mrs. Robinson. Ben exudes a confidence that was nonexistent before in the movie. However, minutes subsequently Ben realizes that although sex, beer, and relaxation are attractive, but are non every bit fulfilling as he had suspected. The collage of images in which word pictures of Ben & # 8217 ; s two summer chases, lounging about, and Mrs. Robinson are interspliced exhibits this thought. As Ben remains in bed at the Taft hotel, Mrs. Robinson repeatedly passes back and Forth. This potpourri of images can be straight linked to Ben & # 8217 ; s uncertainness in the determinations he has made, and the life that he is taking. It seems as if Ben & # 8217 ; s matter with Mrs. Robinson has served as an act of rebellion against his parents and society. Although he finally realizes that this matter is non every bit glamourous as he had thought it, Ben has eventually liberated himself by doing a determination. Once once more Nichols & # 8217 ; s usage of blinking allows the spectator to come in into Ben & # 8217 ; s character and serves to expose his interior ideas and feelings.

After watching The Graduate it is obvious that Nichols has created a chef-d’oeuvre, which will digest for decennaries. As Ben makes his rite of transition to manhood and finds his true ego, his feelings and emotions are captured finely by Nichols. By utilizing metaphors such as bare flashes, a aqualung suit, and colour deformation, Nichols brings us closer to Ben & # 8217 ; s character and helps to supply an in-depth expression at a apparently typical college alumnus. Although Ben choose a route less traveled in his hunt for himself, his narrative will stay everlastingly in the heads of all who watch The Graduate. Ben is non entirely in his approach of age in this movie, as Nichols grows besides, go forthing a lasting impact on film history through his punctilious direct

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